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Frequently Asked Questions - Hayabusa
 
Supercharger kit reliability
Advantages of the Gen 2 engine over the Gen 1 engine
Whether to use 4 or 8 injectors on Hayabusa engines
Air horn size on standard Gen1 Hayabusa
Advantages of MBE ECU over Power Commander
Changing from standard Hayabusa wiring to a SBD wiring harness
Misfire on Hayabusa at high rpm
Hayabusa oil pressure levels
Hayabusa oil temperatures
Hayabusa Oil System Recommendation
Hayabusa Dry Sump System Oil Levels
 
Supercharger kit reliability
Question: I’m just thinking of acquiring an OMS and fitting your GSXR 1300 Supercharger Kit SC02 to it.  What is the price on the kit? The big question, would it stay together for a season of hillclimbing as I can’t afford a 2nd one mid-season?

Answer: We ran the SC01 kit for a complete season in the British Sprint Championship finishing 2nd Overall and winning the 2L Racing Car Class at the first attempt.  The engine is super reliable and as I am sure you can imagine, the British Sprint runs are significantly longer than hillclimbs.  The car also carried out significant testing on circuits in between events.  The second year we upgraded to the SC02 kit, but due to various personal reasons, I was unable to compete for the full season.   

We have done significant design and development for other customers with either complete or partial projects and unreliability only occurs as the engines performance levels have been pushed too far.  Quite often a problem is caused, not by the engine itself but by the transmission of the power from the engine to the back wheels.  The biggest problem is that the transmission was never designed to cope with the amount of performance going through it and then when linked to very sticky tyres, particularly so on a hillclimb car, where it is all important for ultimate low speed traction, the forces involved are many times greater than that of a motorbike which has a much smaller tyre contact patch, so quite often failures will occur in the transmission area. 

The second area where issues arise, particularly common in hillclimbing at National level is that the average speed is very low, which means the intercooler ideally needs to be very large.  This is something that goes against the grain in hillclimbing, where weight is all important, so a common solution is to change to Methanol, this again brings its own series of problems; fuel demand is doubled, the fuel itself is quite aggressive and wears out or damages its surrounding components, special fuel pumps are required and special injectors.

All the issues described above are regularly seen at National level, most of the competitors out there are approaching it in a way that we would not suggest being the correct solution, hence many of the issues you see. 

So the level of performance that I would consider using for reliability would be the SC01 kit, this is effectively using a standard engine with a few upgrading components for strength and a large intercooler correctly fed with a good air flow.  This means your base engine is relatively standard and cheap to replace in the future. Any engines much beyond 330bhp will suffer with transmission issues and the use of Methanol again dramatically increases your costs and complexity of the system. 

We have been redesigning the supercharger plenum due to an issue we had seen with one particular customer, but this is proving more complex than we would like, due to the fact that the shape of the plenum produces the best all round performance and mixture control and the cost of redesigning it has spiralled.  Also the company that we are developing the new design with is now at its busiest time, so we have had to put the design on hold for a few months until their workload has reduced.   We have tried looking at other designs but they all create issues, some of which are significant. 

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Hayabusa oil temperatures
Question: Hello, I’m looking for a for a bit of information. I’m running a Suzuki Hayabusa in stock condition in a converted Van Dieman chassis (FB). I’ve purchased your dry sump and tank which is working quite well. We set the engine up with dual radiators, and one single oil cooler.  Water temps have been 170-180 F, oil temps have been 240 degrees and climbing. We have not allowed temps over 240. We're not really sure what is normal oil temps for this engine , but were concerned were on the edge. Can you offer some info on this and some possible solutions?

Answer: The Suzuki Hayabusa engine, as with many Suzuki engines, has evolved from the oil cooled engines and almost as much heat is transmitted into the oil system as the water system.  The temperature of your oil at 240F (116C) is ok, but because the engine expands the bearing gaps increase dropping oil pressure.  If the temperature could be kept closer to 230F (100C), this would help oil pressure as well.  My suggestion would be to increase your oil cooler size significantly.  You may also find that once you have managed to reduce the oil temperature, that this will also help to control your water temperature better as well.

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Whether to use 4 or 8 injectors on Hayabusa engines
Question: I am currently working on a 1.6L hayabusa and would value your opinion whether to use 4 or 8 injectors?

Answer: The throttle body we designed for the Gen1 engine produced superior torque and power over the standard throttle bodies and during its design, we specifically worked on testing it against 8 injectors on the dyno.  The end result meant that there was no advantage in running 8 injectors. 

The Gen2 engine is produced with 8 injector set up as standard.  We have tested the design on both 1000cc engines and the larger capacity Hayabusa versions.  The standard throttle body set up with 8 injectors only increases performance when the upper injectors are used above 7000rpm and gives an increase of approximately 5bhp.  The reason I believe the manufacturers have gone for 8 injectors is to allow them to move the lower set closer to the engine for emissions and then the upper set in an attempt to regain the performance that would be lost in doing so.  When tested against the twin throttle body set up we have designed to fit the later spacing of the inlet ports of the Gen2 engine, we found we had a gain in performance everywhere over the standard Hayabusa throttle bodies.

So provided you are able to replace the standard throttle bodies with our throttle bodies, they will always give an improvement. 

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Air horn size on standard Gen1 Hayabusa
Question: I have got a Hayabusa 2004 Gen 1 engine with nothing special on it at the moment. I am led to believe that running the 4 short airhorns is a better option, but please correct me if I am wrong.

Answer: The use of a combination of air horn lengths has a tendency to smooth the torque curve, the longer air horns promote lower to mid-range torque and the shorter air horns improve the upper mid-range torque to peak bhp.  If your engine is solely being used at higher rpm on the standard 1299cc engine, then potentially 4 short air horns will be the preferred option.  If you are using a long stroke engine in the future, then 4 longer air horns would be the best option for that engine because the engine does not rev as high. 

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Advantages of MBE ECU over Power Commander
Question: Is it possible to explain the significant difference in peak performance between the power commander and the MBE setup? Are certain variables limited in range using the power commander but not using your kits?

Answer: There are several reasons why the MBE ECU is an advantage over the standard ECU and the use of a Power Commander, I have detailed a few of them below:

  1. The standard ECU on a bike is designed with lots of safety features and emissions control for the standard set up.  Absolute minimum means that the wiring harness is very bulky and needs to be linked to all of the standard sensors so that the stock ECU believes that it is still fitted to a bike, although changes can be made to this, the result will still be bulky and difficult to find faults if a problem occurs.  I believe you will also have to retain the original key assembly and clocks.
  2. When you fit a piggy back system such as a Power Commander to any ECU, this creates a range of issues; first of all the standard ECU does not know of the existence of the Power Commander and therefore it assumes it is running a standard engine.  The stock ECU makes its decisions based on the information it sees from all its sensors, the decisions it makes are based on safety for the rider, safety for the engine and peak performance is not at the top of the list, so for example, if a sensor detects excess air temperature, it will then begin to back engine performance off.  The Power Commander has no control over this and has no idea what the stock ECU is doing, all the Power Commander can do is add or subtract fuel to existing values coming from the ECU.  So if the engine is mapped under perfect conditions, a nice improvement would be achieved within the limitations of the original information that the stock ECU is generating, since the stock ECU under normal conditions is always programmed to be more than safe.  Then when the vehicle is used say in a car such as yours, sensors will back the performance of excessively.  There is also another potential problem that if the engine is mapped under non-standard conditions, many of the features within the stock ECU may have already backed the performance off, the Power Commander is then mapped changing the outputs to optimize its performance at that time and when the vehicle is used under normal conditions the stock ECU reverts to its standard settings, you then may have too much ignition and the wrong amount of fuel.  This could then in worst case conditions destroy your engine.
  3. The advantages of using the MBE are that the ECU processor is much faster than the original ECU, it is able to deliver ignition and fuel when required, not only with the correct amount but can also be positioned to deliver them at exactly the right point in time to produce ultimate performance, where the stock ECU would be more biased to emissions.  Also whenever you are using a piggyback system the information coming from the stock ECU has to be interpreted by the piggyback ECU which then delivers its changes.  In terms of processing time and even engine time, this is a huge delay, which means that the MBE system is considerably faster.  The MBE ECU has the advantage of not having unnecessary switches and equipment as used on the standard road bike and therefore the wiring harness is more compact.  There are many accessories that the MBE ECU is able to provide by simply plugging components into the harness as your budget allows e.g. powershift, launch control and so on.
  4. There are 2 choices for ECU and throttle body set up that could be used; the first which was used on Gary's car was running a 9A8 ECU and a harness that plugs into all the standard 8-injector set up, this works very well but the 8-injector set up used on the stock engine is partially created for performance, but mostly created for emissions, the lower set of injectors give the emissions and the upper set the additional performance, but this design is compromised because of this.  We have designed a throttle body which is similar to that that was developed for the Gen 1 engine, they had to be altered due to the spacing of the inlet on the Gen 2 engine and they now come in pairs.  We have found in extensive tests that the twins give an improvement in performance when fitted to the Hayabusa version and the 1000cc Suzuki engine as well.
Your decision for which way you intend on going, should be based on what you intend on doing in the future. Using the 9A8 option with wiring harness and running the standard throttle bodies will work extremely well, but limits your total performance if you want to improve the spec further later on. The 9A4 option with the new spec throttle bodies, will allow for a neater and more compact package and if you then decide to upgrade the engine to say a 1600, is a neat solution with the added benefit of the new spec throttle bodies. There may also be some second hand MBE9A4’s that Steve Owen may have because of some of the upgrades he is doing to the latest 9A9 ECU. The 9A9 allows for full gearbox control with pneumatic gear shift, traction, launch control to be all done by one ECU. So Steve will be removing some fairly modern systems which could potentially be fitted to your car only requiring the map to be updated in the ECU and the addition of the throttle bodies.
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Advantages of the Gen 2 engine over the Gen 1 engine
Question: What are the differences between the Hayabusa Gen1 engine and Gen 2 engine?

Answer:The Hayabusa Gen 2 engine 1340cc has been around now since 2008 and therefore more readily available.  The earlier Gen 1 engines were discontinued at the end of 2007, this means that the engines are now getting quite old and in shorter supply because of its popularity.  The Gen 2 has quite a few advantages over the earlier engine; the gearbox was dramatically improved and some of the shortcomings in the original design and the weak output shaft were overcome.  The slight increase in engine stroke gives a nice improvement in torque and the engine having a better design of piston and higher compression has allowed the engine to produce the performance in standard form of a reasonably tuned Gen 1 engine and with the added advantage of the increased torque, a nicer all round package.  The cam profile are also slightly larger, which helps add to this.

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Changing from standard Hayabusa wiring to a SBD wiring harness

Question: I have a 1999 std Busa engine that I've mounted in a custom made Ali. Box chassis. I'm building a one off fast road car as a bit of a toy. And I'm stuck! I plan to keep the motor stock as its fast enough for what I want. I've looked at your web site and think you have what I need to get it running?

I have all the original loom and ancillaries but it looks way too complicated and over the top? I would like you if possible to tell me what I need. I need a simple loom, I assume a new ECU? In time I want to have a power shift on it but that’s another budget. Can you supply costs for this? My idea is to have a paddle shift off the steering wheel.

Do your looms just plug in?  What electrics do I need to save from the old loom? I assume I need a charging circuit and a ignition circuit? I'm not too worried about lights etc as these can easily be done on a separate switched circuit.

Also do I need to alter the charging rotor thing? If so is there an exchange option for this part? How does the old one come off?

So in summery could you please list out what parts I need to buy from you with prices and supply some simple instructions to enable me to do it!! Have you a full typical circuit diagram showing what parts of the existing loom/wiring I need to save? The engine does run but I know it can be much simpler. In your loom do you cut out most of the silly sensors? Does the std fuel pump (mine is on the back of the engine) plug straight in? is it a simple plug in start up and go system? I don’t want to make an expensive mistake here.

Answer: Fortunately you have detailed everything you have and everything you require.  The installation of our system will be extremely simple by comparison with what you have there.  Most of our harness will simply plug in to the original coils and sensors and what sensor you don't require will simply be eliminated.  The only update we have carried out recently to our wiring harness is to change the injector connectors to make them more user friendly for future engine updates, but it is a fairly simple process to either add or make simple adaptors to convert from the standard Suzuki injectors to our wiring harness (there is no cutting of our wiring harness).  If you are ok with a heat gun and a crimp tool, it is no more than 1/2 hours work.  There are instructions within the installation instructions of the kit that show you in pictures how to modify the connectors, which you would remove your existing harness.  The connector kit is included in the price.  If you feel this is something you would not like to tackle for yourself, simply send us your sub harness and we will charge you 1/2 hour to carry out this work for you.

The charging circuit is relatively easy to modify but we do make a simple charging harness, which is made for one of our American customer which simply plugs into the generator and the regulator pack and then gives you 2 wires for positive and negative.  I have also included this in the quote.

The small modifications you require to carry out our simple wiring, again if you feel that this is not an area that you are comfortable with, these components could be sent to us and we could modify them for you at the same time.

Your original fuel pump can be used, the only issue you could potentially have is that on the motorbike the petrol tank is mounted about the engine and therefore the fuel is gravity fed to it, when fitting it to a car you would need to ensure that the pump is mounted lower or at least at the same level as the bottom of the fuel tank, so you may need to reposition it.  Alternatively, if your budget allows, you could a more traditional supply and return system and replace the fuel pump, fuel rail and fuel regulator to suit.  I  have not quoted you for this at this moment in time as you will better for yourself as to the installation of your car and what is and is not possible.

The generator trigger wheel is easily changed with the correct Suzuki tool or if you are suitable mechanically minded, it wouldn't be too difficult to produce something for yourself.  Effectively you need to remove the generator cover, then there is a bolt retaining the generator rotor which locks it on to a taper and key.  You simply undo the bolt, which exposes an external thread, the Suzuki tool is then tightened into this thread, there is then 2 flats on either side of the generator, which can be held with a spanner.  This then pulls the generator off the crank, the generator itself on the early engines such as you have, has 8 teeth and you require a 24-1 which is fitted to the 2003 - 2007 engines.  Although in the past some people have tried modifying the original motor, because metal has to be add in to some of the gaps, they usually damage the magnets of the rotor itself, so we do not recommend this option.  It is best to hunt through eBay or similar to look for a second hand unit, new units are available but are very expensive. 

Once the system is fitted and the throttle position sensor is adjusted, which can be done with a volt meter, with the standard map loaded which we would supply in the kit, your engine will be ready to run and use.  I have also attached the link for the fitting instructions, which gives you pictorial information to show how easy it is. 

LM9A4-GSXR-M-OMS-2 fitting instructions

It may be worth a phone call to speak to me directly as quite often questions you may have, that you may feel are complicated can be simply answered on the phone.  The system you are looking at is, we believe, the simplest on the market and we supply this kit worldwide to trade and retail alike.  If you wish to upgrade your engine and other components associated with it, it can be easily done.  You mentioned about Powershift, the standard wiring harness that we supply has a Powershift connector built in and the ECU will be programmed and ready to use it as standard.  You can simply then order the Powershift unit, which you fix to the lever on the gearbox and connect the other end of the cable to your steering wheel paddle or gear lever.

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Hayabusa oil pressure levels
Question: I had my first roll out with my Caterham Hayabusa last weekend. Everything worked well, the only thing I have to ask is the oil pressure. With warm oil the engine has less than 1 bar at idle 1200 1/min with 4000 1/min I have more than 3 bar up to 7 (I have seen at the dash) which should be normal. Is is although normal to have less than 1 bar in idle?

Answer: It is probably best if I quote the figures in psi and then you can convert them to Bar (1Bar = 14.7psi).  When your engine is cold (oil temperature of 0 - 20degrees C) at tickover, I would expect to see between 50 - 60psi approximately and if revved over 100psi.  Obviously this is not recommended until the engine is hot. 

As the oil temperature rises, the tickover oil pressure will drop quite quickly and I would expect to see approximately 20psi when oil temperature is 60 degrees C.  As the engine is revved, peak oil pressure will probably be just under 100psi.  I would recommend that you try and maintain between 80 - 100 degrees C, this way your oil pressure at tickover will be in the region of 7psi and peak oil pressure 60 - 70psi.

The further the temperature rises, the lower the pressure will get, this drop in oil pressure is caused by 2 main factors; first of all the engine block grows dramatically with heat causing increased clearance between the bearings and the crank and secondly the oil itself gets thinner with heat, this is quite normal.  If your engine was running a standard oil pump gear as opposed to our uprated gear, I would expect to see a 10% reduction in oil pressure throughout the range.  It is not uncommon with oil temperatures in excess of 120 degrees C being tickover oil pressure as low as 2psi and peak oil pressure down to 35psi.  The most important thing to look out for is that the oil pressure follows the rpm, if you see any drops in oil pressure at higher rpm it is likely that your oil tank is carrying insufficient oil and therefore oil surge is occurring, which will cause engine damage.

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Misfire on Hayabusa at high rpm
Question: Customer has been having problems with a misfire on his Suzuki hayabusa engine at high rpm.

Answer: It was eventually diagnosed, via email that the crank sensor had been wired the wrong way. This situation could occur if the wires or connectors have been changed on the engine. The oscilloscope trace shown below is correct.

Crank  Oscilloscope trace
Hayabusa Crank Sensor Wiring to MBE 992/9A4 To Engine

This situation can occur on both Vauxhall & Duratec engines, please see linked instruction sheet. IMPORTANT: these instructions only apply to our set-ups using MBE management systems.

Vauxhall/Ford Timing Wheel

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Hayabusa Oil System Recommendation
Question: I have a wet sump oil system on my Hayabusa powered hillclimb car, I was thinking of changing to dry sump, do you recommend this change and what are the benefits?

Answer: We would always recommend the use of dry sump, we have spent nearly 4 years developing our dry sump system. When using a wet sump engine in a car, the oil level normally has to be raised above the window of the oil level indicator, increasing it's capacity. This has 2 additional problems; first of all the increased oil level means that the crankshaft is fighting through oil (a bit like trying to run through a swimming pool), this will increase the losses the engine sees. The second and more important issue is that when the vehicle is used on the track or hillclimb, the extra oil is being continually thrown about the engine, the losses that this will incur will be almost impossible to measure but will be considerable under certain conditions such as change of direction. Do not forget that when the engine is used on a bike, that the bike is continually leaning and the g-forces automatically force the oil to the bottom of the engine so therefore the problems mentioned above either do not arise or are nowhere near as bad for this reason.

Recently one of our dealers tested a wet sump engine on the rolling road with a full depth standard sump with the oil level filled to the normally Suzuki recommended level, he then converted the same engine to dry sump and found an 4bhp increase in performance. He has still to carry out further tests, so we hope to be able to provide proper results shortly.

Our system has some very clever features, which are designed to reduce oil wastage in the system, therefore helping to maintain maximum oil level in the dry sump tank. The height of the sump is 40mm. It also has built in scavenge troughs, that are enclosed in our two piece sump pan, they connect directly to the scavenge pump and therefore no need for external scavenge pipes. You only have a supply line from the oil tank and return line to the tank, where an oil cooler can be fitted if required.

Links: Hayabusa Dry sump system

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Hayabusa Dry Sump System Oil Levels
Question: As mentioned on the phone briefly this week I could do with some help with the dry sump kit I have on my MNR. It has a 2006 Suzuki Hayabusa engine. Two breather cans were fitted as part of a mod to the sump kit as my car was spitting oil when it was rolling roaded for set up. The driver side takes a feed from the plate on the gearbox and the other next to the main tank itself. Both cans are then connected by a pipe. The can next to the main tank has had holes drilled into the top. This can fills with oil over time and then reaches a point where it is over half full and then every time the engine is revved oil spits out of the holes onto the engine bay. The oil in the can next to the main tank can not drain using gravity to the other can on the drivers side as the can next to the main tank is lower than the other. Can you recommend what I can do to sort?

Answer: There is no reason why you cannot use two catch tanks, but I think your problems can be sorted reasonably simply. I will initially explain what the potential issues are and then a way to remedy it. It can be difficult to get the oil level correct in the tank because it rises and falls to different levels at different times e.g. if the engine is left, the oil will drain slowly out of the oil tank into the engine and then on start up the scavenge pump will rapidly extract all this oil out pumping it back into the tank. During the start up period it will also extract all the oil that would normally have been around the clutch, gearbox and cylinder head area when the engine is running. But due to the fact the engine has been left stationary all this oil is now at the bottom of the engine ready to be drawn out and this can be as much as an extra litre. This will only be in the tank for a short period of time, as a scavenge pump is much larger than the pressure pump (which it needs to be). Once the engine has been running for a few seconds, the engine begins to coat the gearbox, clutch area and cylinder head with a film of oil. This then means the oil level in the tank should go down to its normal running level. Normally when you are using our 5” dry sump tank, the oil level after this initial period can be checked with the engine running and should be approximately 5 – 10mm just below the top baffle which can be seen with the cap removed and normally the engine running.

If you are having difficulty checking the oil level, I would suggest that you turn the engine off and check the oil level within seconds to ensure that the level is correct. But during the start up period the excess oil can sometimes be blown out of the breather. You will usually find that in general the system will find its own level. If you were to use one single catch tank which had a capacity between 1 litre to 2 litres with an exit at the bottom of the tank. This should go to the breather on the top of the gearbox which will allow any excess oil blown out the dry sump tank to drain back into the engine. Then in the side of the catch tank a breather from the dry sump tank. The reason it is done this way round is the dry sump tank will always have positive air pressure, because the scavenge pumps flow a greater volume of oil or oil and air, depending on how much oil is left in the bottom of the engine. This pressure has to go somewhere and eventually needs to get to atmosphere which you can do from the filter of the catch tank. If oil vapour is passed along this breather, it will then drop to the bottom of the catch tank and be returned to the engine. The engine is normally under a slight vacuum which means it will try and draw back the oil that the catch tank has received. The reason I suggest a larger capacity catch tank is that if you have over filled the dry sump tank itself, this will give sufficient space for the excess oil to accumulate safely and then return to the engine. If a tube is fitted to the side of the catch tank this will give you a visual indication of what is going on. For example, if you have put too much oil into the system and it is not being returned to the engine, you will notice the level indicator on the side of the tank could potentially show you that it has oil within it. When the engine is in good condition and the oil level is correct, then the catch tank should remain empty.

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